‘Lost Languages & Other Stories’ at Dye House Gallery, Bradford School of Art


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John Blanke

Joy Gregory’s solo show ‘Lost Languages & Other Stories’ has opened at the Dye House Gallery, Bradford School of Art, [Westholme Street, Bradford BD7 1AY] on Friday 14th October 2016.

Symposium: Behind the Scenes at a Photography Gallery
Friday 14 October 2016, 1.00pm to 4.00pm

This opening day of the show coincided with the symposium ‘Behind the Scenes at a Photography Gallery’, presented by Bradford School of Art in association with Impressions.

An afternoon of talks by artists and curators offering a glimpse of what goes on behind the scenes at a gallery. Expect insights into the curator – artist relationship and collaborative working in different spaces at this not-to-be-missed event for students, lecturers and photography enthusiasts. A great opportunity to find out more for photographers taking their first steps towards exhibiting in a gallery.

The exhibition spans more than 25 years of practice and is a rare opportunity to see such a wide range the work [from photography, to drawing and video] in one space. It will run from 14 October to Thursday 17 November 2016.

Lost Languages and other voices is a major retrospective of work by Joy Gregory, one of the most significant artists to emerge from the Black British photography movement of the 1980s.

Spanning twenty years the exhibition brings together fourteen bodies of work exploring race, history and gender, encompassing a wide range of photographic media from digital video installations to Victorian printing techniques. The title of the exhibition refers to the works Gomera (2008) and Kalahari (2010) in which Gregory draws attention to the cultural importance of marginalised African indigenous languages. Journeys feature recurrently in Gregory’s work, which has been made in diverse locations including South Africa, the Orkneys, Sri Lanka, and the Caribbean.

Assumptions about feminine beauty are also consistently explored. The Fairest (1998) and Bottled Blonde (1998) examine the desire to be blonde and its racial implications, whilst Objects of Beauty (1992 – 1995) critiques consumer products of the Western fashion industry. Many of the works have been fabricated specially for this show, and are being shown here for the first time in the UK.

SYMPOSIUM
http://www.impressions-gallery.com/events/event.php?id=327

EXHIBITION
http://www.impressions-gallery.com/news/news.php?id=175